Walk Talk Series Day 31 – Perceived Exertion Scale and low-Carb/high Fiber Foods

||||Walk Talk Series Day 31 – Perceived Exertion Scale and low-Carb/high Fiber Foods

Walk Talk Series Day 31 – Perceived Exertion Scale and low-Carb/high Fiber Foods

Walk Talk Series

Day 31 – Perceived Exertion Scale and low-Carb/high Fiber Foods

Affirmation of the Day

I am walking tall in my body and spirit.
I achieve growth easily.

Perceived Exertion Scale

When exercising, it’s important to monitor your intensity to make sure you’re working at a pace that is challenging enough to help you reach your goals, but not so hard that you blow a lung. One way to do that is to use a Perceived Exertion Scale.

In general, for most workouts you want to be at around Level 5-6. If you’re doing interval training, you want your recovery to be around a 4-5 and your intensity blasts to be at around 8-9. As you’ll see below, working at a level 10 isn’t recommended for most workouts. For longer, slower workouts, keep your PE at Level 5 or lower.

Level 1: I’m watching TV and eating bon bons.
Level 2: I’m comfortable and could maintain this pace all day long.
Level 3: I’m still comfortable, but am breathing a bit harder.
Level 4: I’m sweating a little, but feel good and can carry on a conversation effortlessly.
Level 5: I’m just above comfortable, am sweating more and can still talk easily.
Level 6: I can still talk, but am slightly breathless.
Level 7: I can still talk, but I don’t really want to. I’m sweating like a pig.
Level 8: I can grunt in response to your questions and can only keep this pace for a short time period.
Level 9: I am probably going to die.
Level 10: I am dead.

Today’s Walk

  • 30-60 minute walk in the healthy heart zone 50-60% of your maximum heart rate
  • Warm up with 5 minutes at a very easy pace
  • Find a safe spot with a wall or pole to do a 5 minute easy stretching routine
  • Now resume your walk at a comfortable pace
  • End with 5 minutes of gentle stretching.

Advanced walkers: Threshold Walk

Exercise: Upper Body Workout

Getting Fiber on a Low Carb Diet

It is a common misconception that reduced carbohydrate diets are automatically low in fiber. In fact, most non-starchy vegetables and low sugar fruits are quite high in fiber, and a well-constructed low carb diet emphasizes vegetables and other sources of fiber. Unfortunately, most people, at least in the US, don’t get close to the recommended amounts of daily fiber, no matter how many carbs they are eating! But there is no reason for you to be one of those people.

High-Fiber Low-Carb Food List

Almost All Fiber

  • Flax: There is almost no usable carbohydrate in flax seeds. It is very high in both soluble and insoluble fiber (about one third of the fiber is soluble), and has a pile of nutrients to boot. Flax is just could be the ultimate low-carb fiber source. 1 T ground flax has 2.0 grams of carbohydrate, 1.9 of which is fiber.
  • Chia:  Seeds have a fiber and carb profile similar to flax seeds.

Vegetables that are close to all fiber: Mustard Greens, Chicory, Endive

More Fiber Than Usable Carbohydrate

  • Wheat Bran – ½ cup raw, 3 grams usable carb, 6 grams fiber
  • Unsweetened Coconut and Coconut Flour – 1 ounce, 2 grams usable carb, 5 grams fiber
  • High Fiber Cereals – Check the labels carefully, but a few high fiber cereals are also low or fairly low in carbohydrate. Examples: All Bran with Extra Fiber; Fiber One
  • Collard Greens – 1 cup chopped, cooked, 4 grams usable carb, 5 grams fiber
  • Avocado, Hass – 1 medium avocado, 3 grams usable carb, 12 grams fiber
  • Spinach and Chard – 1 cup chopped, cooked � 3 g usable carb, 4 g fiber Frozen 1 10 oz package � 3 g usable carb, 8 g fiber 6 cups of raw spinach or chard=about 1 cup cooked
  • Broccoli – 1/2 cup chopped, cooked, 1 gram usable carb, 3 grams fiber 1 cup chopped, raw, 4 grams usable carb, 2 grams fiber
  • Cauliflower – 1/2 cup pieces, cooked,1 gram usable carb, 2 grams fiber 1 cup raw, 2 grams usable carb, 2.5 grams fiber
  • Blackberries – 1 cup, raw, 6 grams usable carb, 8 grams fiber

About as Much Usable Carb as Fiber

  • Asparagus – 1/2 cup pieces, 2 grams usable carbs, 2 grams fiber
  • Celery – 1 cup chopped, 1.5 grams usable carb, 1.5 grams fiber
  • Eggplant – 1 cup raw, cubed, 2 grams usable fiber, 3 grams fiber 1 cup cubed, cooked, 5 grams usable carb, 3 grams fiber
  • Lettuce, Romaine – 1 cup shredded, .5 gram usable carb, 1 g fiber
  • Mushrooms – 1 cup, sliced, raw, 1 gram usable carb, 1 gram fiber
  • Radishes – 1 cup raw, sliced, 2 grams usable carb, 2 grams fiber
  • Red Raspberries – 1 cup, raw, 7 grams usable carb, 8 grams fiber

High Fiber, but Not As Much Fiber as Usable Carb

  • Rice Bran – 1/4 cup 8 grams usable carb, 6 grams fiber
  • Cabbage – 1 cup raw, chopped, 3 grams usable carb, 2 grams fiber 1/2 cup cooked, chopped, 2 grams usable carb 1 gram fiber
  • Bell Peppers – 1 cup chopped, raw, 4 grams usable carb, 3 grams fiber
  • Snow Peas (edible pod) – 1 cup whole, raw, 3 grams usable carb, 2 grams fiber
  • Zucchini Squash – 1 cup cooked, sliced, 4 grams usable carb, 3 grams fiber
  • Strawberries – 1/2 cup sliced, 5 grams usable carb, 2 grams fiber

 

 

2016-12-12T22:23:36+00:00